Ellis Q. Margolis

Contact Info


University of Arizona Laboratory of Tree-Ring Rese...
105 W. Stadium
Tucson , Arizona 85721, United States

Publications in Fire Ecology

Historical Stand-Replacing Fire in Upper Montane Forests of the Madrean Sky Islands and Mogollon Plateau, Southwestern USA
Pages: 88-107
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.0703088

The recent occurrence of large fires with a substantial stand-replacing component in the southwestern United States (e.g., Cerro Grande, 2000; Rodeo-Chedeski, 2002; Aspen, 2003; Horseshoe 2, Las Conchas, and Wallow, 2011) has raised questions about the historical role of stand-replacing fire in the region. We reconstructed fire dates and stand-replacing fire patch sizes using four lines of tree-ring evidence at four upper montane forest sites (>2600 m) in the Madrean Sky Islands and Mogollon Plateau of Arizona and New Mexico, USA.  [Read More]

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Quaking Aspen Regeneration following Prescribed Fire in 
Lassen Volcanic National Park, California, USA

Pages: 14-26
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.1003014

Prescribed fire is commonly used for restoration, but the effects of reintroducing fire following a century of fire exclusion are unknown in many ecosystems. We assessed the effects of three prescribed fires, native ungulate browsing, and conifer competition on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) regeneration in four small groves (0.5 ha to 3.0 ha) in Lassen Volcanic National Park, California, USA, over an 11 yr period. The effects of fire on aspen regeneration density and height were variable within and among sites.  [Read More]

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Limits to Ponderosa Pine Regeneration Following Large High-Severity Forest Fires in the United States Southwest
Pages: 143-163
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.140114316

High-severity fires in dry conifer forests of the United States Southwest have created large (>1000 ha) treeless areas that are unprecedented in the regional historical record. These fires have reset extensive portions of Southwestern ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson var. scopulorum Engelm.) forest landscapes. At least two recovery options following high-severity fire are emerging. One option is for post-fire successional pathways to move toward a return to the pre-fire forest type. Alternatively, an area may transition to persistent non-forested ecosystems.  [Read More]

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