Craig A. Harper

Contact Info


Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries
University of Tennessee
2431 Joe Johnson Drive
Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA

Publications in Fire Ecology

Variability in Fire Prescriptions to Promote Wildlife Foods in the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem
Pages: 62-78
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.1103062

Prescribed fire is commonly used to restore and maintain the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem (LLPE).  A key function of the LLPE is the provisioning of food for wildlife.  Despite the plethora of literature evaluating the effects of fire season and fire-return interval on plant community dynamics, little attention has been given to the response of wildlife foods to fire season or fire-return interval.  We measured the availability of key wildlife foods (fleshy fruit [i.e., seed containing a nutritious pericarp] and understory plant biomass) in upland pine forest following dormant-season (December–February) and growing-season (April–June) fires in a chronosequential design.  [Read More]

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Variability in Fire Prescriptions to Promote Wildlife Foods in the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem
Pages: 62-79
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.1103062

Prescribed fire is commonly used to restore and maintain the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem (LLPE).  A key function of the LLPE is the provisioning of food for wildlife.  Despite the plethora of literature evaluating the effects of fire season and fire-return interval on plant community dynamics, little attention has been given to the response of wildlife foods to fire season or fire-return interval.  We measured the availability of key wildlife foods (fleshy fruit [i.e., seed containing a nutritious pericarp] and understory plant biomass) in upland pine forest following dormant-season (December–February) and growing-season (April–June) fires in a chronosequential design.  [Read More]

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Fire Effects on Wildlife in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachian Regions, USA
Pages: 127-159
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.1202127

Fire is being prescribed and used increasingly to promote ecosystem restoration (e.g., oak woodlands and savannas) and to manage wildlife habitat in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachian regions, USA. However, questions persist as to how fire affects hardwood forest communities and associated wildlife, and how fire should be used to achieve management goals. We provide an up-to-date review of fire effects on various wildlife species and their habitat in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachians.  [Read More]

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