Peter M. Brown

Contact Info


Rocky Mountain Tree-Ring Research
Colorado State University
2901 Moore Lane
Fort Collins , CO 80526, United States

Publications in Fire Ecology

Multi-Millennial Fire History of the Giant Forest, Sequoia National Park, California, USA
Pages: 120-127
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.0503120

Giant sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] J. Buchholz) preserve a detailed history of fire within their annual rings. We developed a 3000 year chronology of fire events in one of the largest extant groves of ancient giant sequoias, the Giant Forest, by sampling and tree-ring dating fire scars and other fire-related indicators from 52 trees distributed over an area of about 350 ha. When all fire events were included in composite chronologies, the mean fire intervals (years between fires of any size) declined as a function of increasing spatial extent from tree, to group, to multiple groups, to grove scales: 15.5 yr (0.1 ha), 7.4 yr (1 ha.), 3.0 yr (70 ha), and 2.2 yr (350 ha), respectively. We interpreted widespread fires (i.e., fire events recorded on ≥2 trees, or ≥25 % of all trees recording fires within composites) to have occurred in areas of 70 ha to 350 ha at mean intervals ranging from about 6 yr to 35 yr.  [Read More]

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Did the 2002 Hayman Fire, Colorado, USA, Burn with Uncharacteristic Severity?
Pages: 117-132
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.1203117

There is considerable interest in evaluating whether recent wildfires in dry conifer forests of western North America are burning with uncharacteristic severity—that is, with a severity outside the historical range of variability. In 2002, the Hayman Fire burned an unlogged 3400 ha dry conifer forest landscape in the Colorado Front Range, USA, that had been the subject of previous fire history and forest age structure research.  [Read More]

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