Carl N. Skinner

Contact Info


Pacific Southwest Research Station
Forest Service
3644 Avtech Parkway
Redding , CA 96002, United States

Publications in Fire Ecology

Effects of Creating Two Forest Structures and Using Prescribed Fire on Coarse Woody Debris in Northeastern California, USA
Pages: 1-13
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.0502001

Little is known about the dynamics of coarse woody debris (CWD) in forests that were originally characterized by frequent, low-moderate intensity fires. We investigated effects of prescribed burning at the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest in northeastern California following creation of two stand structure conditions: 1) high structural diversity (HiD) that included retaining large, old-growth trees while thinning smaller trees in the understory through whole-tree harvesting, and 2) low structural diversity (LoD) simulating a more traditional approach that removed overstory trees by individual tree selection while thinning the vigorous younger trees and removing the suppressed understory by whole-tree harvesting.  [Read More]

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Human and Climatic Influences on Fire Occurrence in California’s North Coast Range, USA
Pages: 76-99
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.0503076

Outside of the immediate coastal environments, little is known of fire history in the North Coast Range of California. Fire scar specimens were collected from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa C. Lawson), sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Douglas), incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens [Torr] Florin), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) for seven plots in mixed-conifer forests from the Mendocino National Forest, California, USA. Five plots were on high ridges immediately adjacent to the Sacramento Valley (DRY plots). The other two plots were on mesic north facing slopes interior in the range (MESIC plots), and were separated from the Sacramento Valley by at least one to several ridge systems. These two plots were selected because they supported populations of rare lady’s slipper orchids (Cypripedium fasciculatum [Kellogg ex S. Watson] and C. montanum [Douglas ex Lindl.]).  [Read More]

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Shrub Seed Banks in Mixed Conifer Forests of Northern California and the Role of Fire in Regulating Abundance
Pages: 32-48
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.0801032

Understory shrubs play important ecological roles in forests of the western US, but they can also impede early tree growth and lead to fire hazard concerns when very dense.  Some of the more common genera (Ceanothus, Arctostaphylos, and Prunus) persist for long periods in the seed bank, even in areas where plants have been shaded out.  To determine shrub seed density and investigate the feasibility of managing shrub abundance by regulating the size of the soil seed bank with fire, we sampled the seed bank in 24 mixed conifer forest stands throughout northern California.  [Read More]

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