Malcolm P. North

Contact Info


Pacific Southwest Research Station
USDA Forest Service
1731 Research Park Drive
Davis , CA 001-530-754-7398 , United States

Publications in Fire Ecology

Truffle Abundance in Recently Prescribed Burned and Unburned Forests in Yosemite National Park: Implications for Mycophagous Mammals
Pages: 105-114
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.0402105

Truffles are an important food resource for wildlife in North American forests, but decades of fire exclusion have altered the availability of this resource. In Yosemite National Park, resource management policies seek to restore essential forest processes such as fire while minimizing adverse ecological impacts that may result from burning decades of accumulated fuels.  [Read More]

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Climate, Rain Shadow, and Human-Use Influences on Fire Regimes in the Eastern Sierra Nevada, California, USA
Pages: 20-34
DOI: 10.4996/fireecology.0503020

There have been few fire history studies of eastern Sierra Nevada forests in California, USA, where a steep elevation gradient, rain shadow conditions, and forest stand isolation may produce different fire regimes than those found on the range’s western slope. We investigated historic fire regimes and potential climate influences on four forest types ranging in elevation from 1700 m to 3200 m on the Sierra Nevada’s eastern slope and the White Mountains’ western slope. Sample areas (approximately 15 ha to 45 ha) had mean site fire return intervals ranging from 4.8 yr to 16.9 yr across ten Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi Balf.) sites, and 13.4 yr to 45.7 yr across four high elevation lodgepole (P. contorta Douglas ex Louden), foxtail (P. balfouriana Balf.) and bristlecone (P. longaeva D.K. Bailey) pine sites.  [Read More]

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